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This is the canon of known good sentences in [[wikipedia:Dothraki Language|Dothraki]] with [[gloss]]es, or with situational information, given out in interviews with [[David J. Peterson]], or from the original text of [[wiki:George R.R. Martin | Martin]]'s books. All references to other languages in the series can go on the [[Other languages]] page. Since there are only "about thirty words - mostly names" in the books,<ref name="tor">{{Cite web |url=http://www.tor.com/blogs/2010/04/creating-dothraki-an-interview-with-david-j-peterson-and-sai-emrys |title=Tor.Com |date=April 22, 2010 }}</ref> the majority of words here should come from David Peterson. Explanations of the various sources can be found on the [[Canon]] page.
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This is the canon of known good sentences in [[wikipedia:Dothraki Language|Dothraki]] with [[gloss]]es, or with situational information, given out in interviews with [[David J. Peterson]]. All Dothraki information from the original books belongs on the [[Original Corpus]] page. All references to other languages in the series can go on the [[Other languages]] page. Explanations of the various sources can be found on the [[Canon]] page.
 
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=George R.R. Martin=
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==A Game of Thrones==
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The chapters in a Game of Thrones are not numbered. The following is a sequential list of some of the less common Dothraki words.
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The first reference we have to the Dothraki language is when Dany mentions that "the Dothraki called that land '''Rhaesh Andahli''', the land of the Andhals," (in reference to Westeros).<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page= 30 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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Later, five Dothraki words are mentioned simultaneously.
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:""'''Drogo''' is so rich that even his slaves wear golden collars. A hundred thousand men ride in his '''khalasar''', and his palace in '''Vaes Dothrak''' has two hundred rooms and doors of solid silver." There was more like that, so much more, what a handsome man the '''khal''' was, so tall and fierce, fearless in battle, the best rider ever to mount a horse, a demon archer."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page= 32 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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At the wedding ceremony, Dany describes the Dothraki feasting, with " their voices harsh and alien in Dany's ears". This seems to suggest that not many Dothraki frequent Pentos, and that their language is significantly different from the Pentos language. And later, "They had no common language. Dothraki was incomprehensible to her, and the '''khal''' knew only a few words of the bastard Valyrian of the Free Cities, and none at all of the Common Tongue of the Seven Kingdoms." The first refence to an '''arakh''' follows: "...in the blink of an eye the '''arakhs''' were out, long razor sharp blades, half sword and half scythe." <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=101-2 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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The bloodriders are mentioned at the wedding:
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:The '''khal's''' bloodriders offered her the traditional three weapons, and splendid weapons they were. Haggo gave her a great leather whip with a silver handle, Cohollo a magnificent '''arakh''' chased in gold, and Qotho a double-curved dragonbone bow taller than she was. <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=104-5 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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Drogo's gift involves a translation that should be interesting, as well as the word for Dany's position:
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:'''Khal Drogo''' said something in Dothraki and Magister Illyrio translated. "Silver for the silver of your hair, the '''khal''' says."..."Custom decrees that the '''khaleesi''' must ride a mount worthy of her place by the side of the '''khal'''."..."Tell '''Khal Drogo''' that he has given me the wind." The fat Pentoshi stroked his yellow beard as he repeated her words in Dothraki, and Dany saw her new husband smile for the first time. <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=105 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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Dany, upon first seeing the Dothraki Sea, marvels at the green of the grass. Ser Jorah responds: "And this is only '''hranna''', child. There are a hundred kinds of grass out there..." Later, they are interrupted by voices, and she notes that "Her handmaid Irri and the young archers of her '''khas''' were fluid as centaurs."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=226-7 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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When Viserys is ordered to walk behind the column, he is laughingly called '''Khal Rhae Mhar''' ''the sorefoot king'', and later, having taken a cart, '''Khal Rhaggat''' ''the Cart King''.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=385 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> 
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Dany is told that she must appear before the '''dosh khaleen''', all of whom had once been '''khaleesi''', but now held council in '''Vaes Dothrak'''. '''Cohollo''' is mentioned next, as the warrior who had "saved the young '''khalakka''' from sell-swords", '''Drogo''' at that point not yet being a full '''khal'''.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=391 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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Another quote provides some full phrases:
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:“'''Khalakka dothrae mr’anha!'''” she proclaimed in her best Dothraki. "''A prince rides inside me!''" She had practiced the phrase for days with her handmaid Jhiqui.
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:The oldest of the crones, a bent and shriveled stick of a woman with a single black eye, raised her arms on high. “'''Khalakka dothrae!'''” she shrieked. ''The prince is riding!''
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:“''He is riding!''” the other women answered. “'''Rakh! Rakh! Rakh haj!'''” they proclaimed. ''A boy, a boy, a strong boy.''<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=490 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> 
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There are some extraneous notes about native Dothraki second language learners: "'''Drogo''' was quick to learn when he put his mind to it, though his accent was so thick and barbarous that neither Ser Jorah nor Viserys could understand a word he said."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=492 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> When Drogo tries to say "Daenerys", he says: "Is good name, Dan Ares wife, moon of my life."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=493 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> This may have some implications for the vowel structure of Dothraki.
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The first zoological term is given to refer to a lion: "'''Drogo''' would take his bloodriders and ride in search of '''hrakkar''', the great white lion of the plains."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=584 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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There are references later to more Dothraki words. As always, it is unsure how literal the Dothraki translation will be:
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:'''Jaqqa rhan''' moved among them, the mercy men with their heavy axes.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=665 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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This was after the battle against the Lhazareen, whom the Dothraki call the '''haesh rakhi''', ''the Lamb Men.''<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=666 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> The word '''ai''' is used here for the first time, assumedly to mean ''yes'', or some sort of obedience. <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=668 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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The Dothraki word for general is mentioned, as '''ko''': "'''Mago''', who rides in the '''khas''' of '''Ko Jhaqo'''." This is confirmed later. As they are mentioned, a Lhazareen named Mirri Maz Duur speaks, who is described as a '''maegi''':
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:A '''maegi''' was a woman who lay with demons and practiced the blackest of sorceries, a vile thing, evil and soulless, who came to men in the dark of night and sucked life and strength from their bodies.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=670-1 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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Later, Mirri Maz Duur states that: "You call me '''maegi''' as if it were a curse, but all it means is ''wise''."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=798 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> It is possible that this is not a Dothraki word, especially as it is brought up by Qyburn of the Citadel as a possible explanation for why an old crone in Lannisport was called 'Maggy'.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Feast for Crows |year=2005 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=544 |isbn= 978-0-553-80150-7}}</ref>
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=== Proper Names ===
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There are several Dothraki names given in the first book. '''Khal Drogo''' is by far the most used. But there are others, and not all from his khalasar:
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:""Those three are Drogo's bloodriders, there," he said. "By the pillar is '''Khal Moro''', with his son '''Rhogoro'''...""<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page= 36 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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Two Dothraki names are present in Viserys gift:
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:'''Irri''' and '''Jhiqui''' were copper-skinned Dothraki... "Irri will teach you riding, Jhiqui the Dothraki tongue..."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=104-5 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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'''Jhogo''' is listed as being one of her '''khas''',<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=226-7 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> as well as '''Quaro''', who is mentioned as liking horse sausage. <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=588 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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'''Aggo''' and '''Rakharo''' are listed as the khal's bloodriders,<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=492 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> as well as '''Cohollo''', who had "saved the young '''khalakka''' from sell-swords", '''Haggo''' and '''Qotho'''.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=391 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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Other Dothraki are mentioned in Vaes Dothrak: "Behind the wise women came the others; '''Khal Ogo''' and his son, the '''khalakka Fogo''', '''Khal Jommo''' and his wives..."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=492 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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'''Drogo''' says that he is the son of '''Bharbo''', when he promises Dany Westeros. <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=594 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref> This is the only Dothraki word to have a /b/ in it.
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Two final Dothraki names are mentioned: "'''Maggo''', who rides in the '''khas''' of '''Ko Jhaqo'''."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Game of Thrones |year= 1996 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=670 |isbn= 978-0-553-57340-4}}</ref>
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==A Clash of Kings==
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There is a clear adjectival derivation from '''qoy''', ''blood'', as laid out by David Peterson:
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:"The Dothraki named the comet '''shierak qiya''', the ''Bleeding Star''."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Clash of Kings |year= 1999 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=187 |isbn= 0-553-57990-8}}</ref>
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'''Vaes Tolorro''', the ''city of bones'', is most likely a Dothraki word, as it shares '''vaes''' with '''Vaes Dothraki'''. <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Clash of Kings |year= 1999 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=201 |isbn= 0-553-57990-8}}</ref>
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Dothraki is described as being guttural. <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Clash of Kings |year= 1999 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=202 |isbn= 0-553-57990-8}}</ref>
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The Dothraki call the Quartheen Milk Men: this is the second collective plural name for a people group, as opposed to naming them based upon their place of habitation or autonyms.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Clash of Kings |year= 1999 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=423 |isbn= 0-553-57990-8}}</ref>
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It is known that the Dothraki pray to a horse god,<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Clash of Kings |year= 1999 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=703 |isbn= 0-553-57990-8}}</ref>  and believe that the stars of spirits of the valiant dead.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Clash of Kings |year= 1999 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=927 |isbn= 0-553-57990-8}}</ref>  This may provide interesting forms of supplication or prayer.
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Ser Jorah uses an English plural on the Dothraki word '''ko'''. The Dothraki plural ought to be '''-i''', as in '''lajaki''' ''warriors''. This quote also shows the names '''Jhaqo''' and '''Pono''', the latter being illegal in Dothraki except in proper names.
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:"Ser Jorah frowned. “Princess, hear me. The Dothraki will not follow a suckling babe. Drogo’s strength was what they bowed to, and only that. When he is gone, '''Jhaqo''' and '''Pono''' and the other '''kos''' will fight for his place, and this '''khalasar''' will devour itself. The winner will want no more rivals. The boy will be taken from your breast the moment he is born. They will give him to the dogs . . . ”
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== A Storm of Swords ==
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Two of the Bloody Mummers are Dothraki: '''Iggo'''<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Storm of Swords |year= 2000 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=42 |isbn=0-553-38170-9}}</ref> and '''Zollo'''.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Storm of Swords |year= 2000 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=345 |isbn=0-553-38170-9}}</ref> Later, the Dothraki who fought the Qohorik Three Thousand Unsullied is named as '''Temmo'''.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Storm of Swords |year= 2000 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=96 |isbn=0-553-38170-9}}</ref>
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The Dothraki do not have a word for sea, calling it ''the poison water''. <ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Storm of Swords |year= 2000 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=86 |isbn=0-553-38170-9}}</ref> When a storm hits the boats, Dany hears "the riders praying in thin quavery voices."<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Storm of Swords |year= 2000 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=87 |isbn=0-553-38170-9}}</ref>
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Daenerys' narration,<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Storm of Swords |year= 2000 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=92 |isbn=0-553-38170-9}}</ref> and Ser Jorah later,<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Storm of Swords |year= 2000 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=97 |isbn=0-553-38170-9}}</ref> both use the english plural -s after '''ko'''.
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Ser Jorah refers to Vaes Tolorro as Vaes Tolorru at one point. This may be a simple misspelling.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Storm of Swords |year= 2000 |publisher= Bantam Dell |page=898 |isbn=0-553-38170-9}}</ref>
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== A Feast for Crows ==
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In the final teaser chapter for A Dance with Dragons, "That is known" is used instead of "It is known", suggesting that it is not an entirely frozen idiom.<ref>{{cite book |last= Martin |first= George R.R. |title= A Feast for Crows |year= 2005 |publisher = Bantam Dell |page=759 |isbn= 0553582038}}</ref>
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= Text Corpus =
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This is the section for original text from [[David J. Peterson]].
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==HBO Press Release==
 
==HBO Press Release==

Revision as of 21:52, 9 September 2010

This is the canon of known good sentences in Dothraki with glosses, or with situational information, given out in interviews with David J. Peterson. All Dothraki information from the original books belongs on the Original Corpus page. All references to other languages in the series can go on the Other languages page. Explanations of the various sources can be found on the Canon page.

Contents

HBO Press Release

In the Press Release, the following words and information were presented: [1]

Did you know? (Hash yer ray nesi?)
The name for the Dothraki people—and their language—derives from the verb dothralat (to ride).
The Dothraki have four different words for carry, three for push, three for pull and at least eight for horse, but no word that means please or follow.
The longest word in Dothraki is athastokhdeveshizaroon, which means from nonsense.
The words for related, weighted net, eclipse, dispute, redhead, oath, funeral pyre, evidence, omen, fang and harvest moon all have one element in common: qoy, the Dothraki word for blood.
Dothraki for to dreamthirat atthiraride—literally means to live a wooden life; in Dothraki, wooden (ido) is synonymous with fake.
The word for prideathjahakar—is derived from jahak, the traditional long braid worn by Dothraki warriors (lajaki).

On Hold for Now

In the On Hold for Now blog post, fonas chek was used as an end of discourse phrase. [2]

Tor.Com

At the end of this interview, Peterson states unambigiously that “The blood of the dragon is qoy zhavvori.

He also analyses athastokhdeveshizaroon, from nonsense:

"Without giving too much away, I can show you some of the internal composition of athastokhdeveshizaroon. First, we’ll strip off the suffix (the last bit added), to get athastokhdeveshizar. With that done, the outer most bit is actually a circumfix. If you remove it, you get astokhdeveshi. So, in this instance, the circumfix is ath- -zar, and you’d write it thus." [3]

References

  1. "Official HBO Press Release". April 12, 2010. http://dothraki.conlang.org/official-hbo-press-release/. 
  2. "On Hold For Now". April 15, 2010. http://dothraki.conlang.org/on-hold-for-now/. 
  3. "Tor.Com". April 22, 2010. http://www.tor.com/blogs/2010/04/creating-dothraki-an-interview-with-david-j-peterson-and-sai-emrys. 
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